23. If the person who worships it has the “power of faith” and the “power of practice,” those powers themselves will manifest the “power of the Buddha” and the “power of the Law” in a copied object of worship. Is this assertion correct?

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This is an upside-down view that reverses cause and effect. It is an arrogant idea.

The “power of the Buddha,” “power of the Law,” “power of faith” and “power of practice” are called the “Four Powers.” Nichikan Shonin explains the relationship between them in “Commentary on “The Object of Worship for Observing One’s Life” (“Kanjin no Honzon Sho Mondan”):

“Know this well. The lotus flower emerges because of water. Our power of faith and our power of practice definitely emerge because of the power of the Law. If there is no water, then the lotus flower itself will not emerge. If there is no power of the Law, then there is absolutely no way any faith or practice will emerge. Even though our power of faith and power of practice emerge because of the power of the Law, do not doubt in the slightest that if the power of the Buddha does not exist, then our faith and practice will recede.”

(Collection of Study Essentials for the Fuji School,
Vol. 4, p. 248)

Of course, the Gohonzon, which is Nichiren Daishonin himself, is endowed with the power of the Buddha and the power of the Law. When we believe (the power of faith) in the Gohonzon and chant Daimoku (the power of practice), the Four Powers unite together and we can attain Buddhahood. No matter how much common mortals direct the power of faith and the power of practice toward a copied counterfeit object of worship that lacks both the power of the Buddha and the power of the Law, true fusion of objective reality and subjective wisdom (kyochi myogo) will never be realized.

The theory of deluded common mortals that the Gohonzon is endowed with the power of the Buddha and the power of the Law because of the power of faith and the power of practice is a non-Buddhist idea that disregards cause and effect. Furthermore, it is the height of arrogance that regards oneself as being superior to the Buddha.